Asli Sungu, born in Turkey in 1975, spans in her practice from video to installations. Her work focuses on private stories, which are often humorous or idiosyncratic but the resonance is something we can all identify with. She explores daily themes that highlight much larger power structures and meanings. She has exhibited her work internationally, including K├╝nstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin (2013), Istanbul Modern Museum (2014), Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn (2014) and the Changwon Sculpture Biennale, Korea (2018). She currently lives and works in Berlin.

 

Four Sermons to the Dead

Photo-collages, interview

2011 - 2013

“In this work, with the help of photo-collage, I rebuilt my dreams that are about death and separation. It was during my mother’s illness and death. These dreams are in a sense very personal for me, but at the same time they belong to the collective consciousness, they are a part of mythology, religion and culture. In these dreams the city that I live in is a mixture of Istanbul and Berlin. The medium photography helps me to show that.” (A.S)

Asl─▒ Sungu in conversation with Angelika Stepken

 

The Sun and the Sunflowers

Video, still

2016

“In this video I was interested in collective memories and personal fears, how they suddenly appear and block our vision and prevent us from being in the moment and how we return to the moment, to ourselves when they dissappear. The one with the sunflowers is about my childhood fear of being swallowed by a shark, namely by a beloved one, what I later – as an adult – found out.

In the other video, during the dawn, I remembered the ship accident that took place in in Bosphorus, Istanbul in 1979, when I was 4 years old. The Romanian ship Independenta collided with a Greek freighter which caused an immense noise, broke the glasses of the windows and brought clouds of fire. My personal fears were as horrifying as this apocalyptic day. As a child unconsciously I integrated that day into my personal fears and had an almost dreamlike, hallucinating memory that I could not even explain to myself. ” (A.S.)